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{presented to 
Ube mntverstts of Toronto 



1bume iJBlafce, 

from tbe boofcs of 
Ube late Ibonoutable 

Cbanccllor of tbe laniversit^ of (Toronto 

(1876*1900) 



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King Edward VII* in his Coronation Robes* 

MS . Illu in in a tion . 



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Ohronicles 
1902 



Cold ana Pictured 



BY 



F.Carruthers Gould 




LONDON: T. FISHER UNWIN. 1903 



FROISSART'S MODERN CHRONICLES. 

1902. 

An Edition on Japan Paper has been prepared 
by the Publisher. It is limited to 50 copies, each 
of which is numbered and signed by the Author. 
Price i is. net. 



FROISSART'S MODERN CHRONICLES. 

1901. 

With special cover design, decorated title, and 
44 illustrations. Fcap. 4to, 33. 6d. 



LONDON : T. FISHER UNWIN. 



(All rights reserved.) 



Here begjwnetj) tfje monfc toolum 

of >ir 9!oljan jFroart: in tofjiclj are get fortl) tfie 

Cronpcleg of (Breat Bretajne, Africa, auto otljer places 

atijojnpnge, in tlje pear of oure orti a tljou^anti 

nine Ijuntireti anti ttoo : in tefyitl) pear 

erotoneti oure mo^t ftig:}) retiouteti 0oberapne 

lortie I^ing (Entoarti VIL, femig: of 

tlje united kingtiom^ of d5reat 

25retagne anti 3t*toK&, 

tiefentier of tlje Cljri^ten 

faptlj, anti (Emperor 

of 3|nHfa, etc. 




INTRODUCTION 



kindly reception accorded to my ' ' Froissarfs 
Modern Chronicles" published last year, has 
encouraged me to essay another volume chronicling the 
principal political events of the year 1902. In this, 
as in my first book, I have attempted to reproduce the 
"atmosphere" of Sir John Froissart, and should 
conscientious critics, zvko reverence accuracy, find faidts 
in my records ', I would plead in excuse that had the 
great mecciceval gossip himself written the political history 
of last year, he might have misinterpreted the story as 
it would have been told to him, and have failed to 
discriminate between figures of speech and facts. For 
it is possible that if Sir John Froissart had siirvived 
to come to England for the Coronation in 1902 he 
might have gathered gossip even from that strange 
modern monster, compounded of a few facts and many 
fancies, the Man in the Street. 

F. CARRUTHERS GOULD. 
v 



CONTENTS 



PAGE; 

PROLOGUE ....... i 

Here speaketh the author of the purpose of these chronicles i 
CHAP. 
I. OF THE TROUBLES OF THE BUFFS .... 3, 

Of the further discomforts of the Buffs ; how the Earl of 
Durdans and Sir Cawmell de Bannerman met together, 
but could not agree ; how Sir Caivmell would not clean 
his slate, and how the Earl would not dwell within the 
Tabernacle ...... 3, 

How a certain man-of-law, Augustine de Birrell, discoursed 

on the way of Metaphors and other harmful weapons . 1 1 



II. OF MATTERS IN PARLIAMENT . . . 17 

Of the opening of the Parliament of England by King 
Edward the Seventh ; of the matters debated therein, and 
how Sir Arthur de Balfour did cause a change to be 
made in the manner of procedure to the end that he and 
others might play at golf . . . .17 

How the English, being desirous of buying horses for the 
army in Africa, sent certain knights and squires 
abroad for that business, and of the animals that they 
bought . . . . . . .22 

vii 



viii Contents 

CHAP. PAGE 

III. OF SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM . . . .26 

Of the orgulous words spoken by a lord of Almaine ; how 
Sir Joseph de Birmingham answered in like manner, of 
the repute he gained thereby, and how he went into the 
City of London and was there received ivith great favour 26 

IV. OF THE WAR IN AFRICA AND OTHER MATTERS . 31 

Of the war in Africa, how the lord de Kitchener caused 
many castles to be builded, and how a certain flying 
Dutchman could not be caught . . . 31 

Of the evil fortune that befell the lord Paul de Methuen, 
how he was sore hurt and taken prisoner, and how the 
Dutch shewed him marvellous courtesy . . -35 

Oj the death of Sir Cecil de Kimberley of Africa, and of 

the Earl of Kimberley of Norfolk in England . -37 

V. OF THE ENDING OF THE WAR IN AFRICA . . 40 

How the war in Africa was made an end of to the great 
joy of the English and the Dutch . . .40 

"VI. OF THE CORONATION OF KING EDWARD AND OF QUEEN 

ALEXANDRA . . . . . .48 

How King Edward, after that he had appointed a day 
for his coronation, fell grievously sick, and of his 
marvellous recovery from his malady . . .48 

How the King and Queen were afterwards crowned in 

the great church of the Abbey of Westminster . .50 

VII. OF THE STRANGE ADVENTURES OF SIR DICKON SEDDON 58 
Of the journey that Sir Dickon Seddon made from 
Maori/and to Africa, how he conversed with the lord de 
Kitchener, and how he hastily departed from Africa and 
sailed to England . . . . .58 

Of the further marvellous adventures of Sir Dickon 
Seddon, how he counselled Sir Joseph de Birmingham 
and others in England, and the end thereof . . 64 



Contents ix 

CHAP. PAGE 

VIII. OF CHANGES IN THE GOVERNANCE . . .68- 

How my lord of Salisbury withdrew himself from the 
governance with Sir Michael le Noir, and Sir Arthur 
de Balfour became the captain of the Blues, and how 
Austen de Birmingham was raised up and Jesse de 
Callings was put aside ..... 68' 

IX. OF THE KING'S GUESTS . . . .72 

How the English and the Almains were contrarious one 
to the other, and how the Emperor of Almaine came to 
England to visit his uncle King Edward . . 72. 

Of the welcome that King Edward gave to the Emperor 
of Almaine, and how they took their pleasures together at 
Sandringham . . . . . 74.- 

How the King Dom Carlos of Portugal did also visit the 
King of England at Sandringham . . .78 

X. OF THE VISIT OF DE LA REY, BOTHA, AND DE WET 

TO ENGLAND, AND OF THE GREAT DRORGAN THAT 
AFFRAYED THE ENGLISH . . . .80 

How the Dutch leaders came to England and were 
presented to the King and Sir Joseph de Birmingham, 
and how they and Oom Paul wrote books about the war 
in Africa ...... 80- 

How a great monster called the Spearpoint Drorgan came 
across the sea and sore affrayed the English . . 86 

XI. OF THE VOYAGE OF SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM TO 

AFRICA . . . . . . .90 

How Sir Joseph de Birmingham departed out of England, 

and went to Africa, and the reason of his going . . 90 

How Sir Joseph de Birmingham tarried by the way in 
Egypt and saw the Pyramids and the Sphinx. How he 
afterwards crossed the Equator, and the gifts he received 
from Neptune . . . ' . . 9& 



List of Illustrations 



How Sir Joseph de Birmingham came to Uganda, and of 
the divers ivild beasts that abound therein 



PAGE 



97 



XII. OF THE CHURCH AND ITS SCHOOLS 

Hoiv the Bishops brought petitions to the governance, 
praying that the Church might be relieved from the burden 
of paying for its schools . 

Hoiv Sir Arthur de Balfour caused a Bill to be drafted, 
and how the governance carried it through Parliament . 

How the Archbishop of Canterbury passed out of this 
mortal life ... 



100 



100 



103 



in 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



FRONTISPIECE. KING EDWARD VII. IN HIS CORONATION ROBES 

(MS. Illlumination.) 

SIR TOBY DE LUCE ...... 4 

SIR CAWMELL DE BANNERMAN CALLETH AT A WAYSIDE INN . 7 
THE EARL OF DURDANS REFUSETH TO DWELL WITHIN THE 

TABERNACLE ....... 9 

SIR JOHN FROISSART CONVERSETH ON THE WAY WITH 

AUGUSTINE DE BIRRELL . . . . .12 

THE EARL OF DURDANS PLAYETH AT THE GAME OF METAPHORS 14 

SIR CAWMELL DE BANNERMAN ALSO PLAYETH AT METAPHORS . 15 
SIR ARTHUR DE BALFOUR HATH BUSINESS TO ATTEND TO IN 

THE COUNTRY 2O 



List of Illustrations xi 

PAGE 

ENGLISH NOBLEMAN PLAYING AT THE GAME OF GOLF . .21 

ENGLISH SQUIRE BUYING HORSES FOR THE ARMY IN AFRICA . 23 
(Remount Records) 

SIR BLUNDELL DE MAPLE PROTESTETH THAT TOWEL-HORSES 
WOULD HAVE BETTER SERVED THE ARMY THAN THE 
HORSES THAT HAD BEEN BOUGHT IN HUNGARY . . 24 

(Remount Records) 

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM DEFIETH THE LORD VON BULOW 

OF ALMAINE . . . . . . .27 

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM GOETH TO GUILDHALL . . 29 

DE WET ........ 33 

DE WET ESCAPETH THROUGH THE FENCE . . -34 

THE LORD PAUL DE METHUEN . . . . 36 

DE LA REY .... ... 38 

THE KING DESIRETH THAT AN END MAY BE MADE OF THE 

WAR IN AFRICA . . . . -41 

DE LA REY, BOTHA, AND DE WET JOURNEY TO VEREENIGING . 42 
THE LORD DE MILNER IS DEEMED TO BE ORGULOUS . . 44 

THE LORD DE KITCHENER COMFORTETH DE WET . . 45 

PLAYING AT THE ORGAN IN THE ABBEY CHURCH OF WESTMINSTER 52 

(Coronation Records) 

THE LORD DE HALSBURY AND THE DUKE OF NORFOLK . . 53 

(From a Stained-glass Window) 

THE EARL OF DURDANS AND THE EARL DE SPENCER . -54 

(From a Stained-glass Window) 

THE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY AND THE DEAN OF WESTMINSTER 55 

(Coronation Records) 

THE DUKE DE MALBROUK AND THE LORD DE LONDONDERRY . 56 

(From a Stained-glass Window) 

SIR DICKON SEDDON ON HIS VIAGE TO AFRICA AND ENGLAND . 59 
SIR DICKON SEDDON PERFORMETH A WAR-DANCE AFTER THE 

MANNER OF THE MEN OF MAORILAND . . 6 1 

SIR DICKON SEDDON DEMANDETH TO KNOW IF THE LORD DE 

KITCHENER HATH NEED OF MORE MUTTON FOR THE 

ENGLISH ARMY IN AFRICA . . . . .62 

THE LORD DE KITCHENER ANSWERETH SIR DICKON SEDDON, 

WHO DEPARTETH IN HASTE . . . . -63 



xii List of Illustrations 



PAGE 

SIR DICKON SEDDON IN LONDON . . . 65 

SIR DICKON SEDDON CONVERSETH WITH SIR JOSEPH DE 

BIRMINGHAM . . . . . .66 

MY LORD OF SALISBURY AND SIR MICHAEL LE NOIR DEPART 

FROM THE GOVERNANCE OF THE BLUES . . .69 

JESSE DE COLLINGS RETURNETH BACK TO HIS THREE ACRES 

AND HIS COW . . . . . -70 

THE KING OF ENGLAND AND THE EMPEROR WILHELM OF 

ALMAINE SHOOT TOGETHER AT SANDRINGHAM . . 75 

THE KING OF ENGLAND, THE EMPEROR WILHELM OF ALMAINE, 

AND THE PRINCE OF WALES, WITH DIVERS OTHERS, GO 

A-HUNTING . . . . . . -77 

THE KING DOM CARLOS OF PORTUGAL AND THE PRINCE OF 

WALES GO A-SHOOTING . . . . -78 

DE WET WRITETH OF THE WAR . . . . -83 

COM PAUL WRITETH HIS CHRONICLES . . . .84 

SIR JOHN DE BRODRICK READETH THE CHRONICLES OF DE WET 85 
THE GREAT SPEARPOINT DRORGAN . . . .87 

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM DEPARTETH ON HIS VIAGE . . 92 

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM IN EGYPT . . . -94 

THE SPHINX . . . . . . -95 

COIN OF SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM . . . .96 

(Westminster Records) 

SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM BEHOLDETH A LION AND A UNICORN 98 
THE BISHOPS BRING PETITIONS TO THE GOVERNANCE . . IO2 

SIR JONAH GORST IS CAST OVERBOARD . . . .104 

MONK DRAFTING A BILL . . . . . . Io6 

(Education Records) 

SIR JAMES DE BRYCE SPEAKETH AGAINST THE BILL . .107 

HUGH OF HATFIELD DESIGNETH A SCHOOL . . . Io8 

DR. JOHN CLIFFORD PREACHING TO THE PEOPLE . . IIO 

FRAGMENT OF A BAS-RELIEF DISCOVERED AT WESTMINSTER . lit 
ARCHBISHOP TEMPLE 112 



Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

PROLOGUE 

Here speaketh the author of the purpose of these chronicles. 

IT may be that the first book of these chronicles 
was not examined nor corrected so justly as such 
a case requireth. Therefore to acquit me in that 
behalf, and in following the truth as near as I can, I 
have enterprisecl to set down the true report of the 
acts, gests and deeds done in our parts, and in Africa, 
in the year of our Lord a thousand nine hundred and 
two, and how and with what labours, dangers, and 
perils they were gested and done. 

Truth it is that I, who have enterprised this book 
to ordain for pleasure and pastance, deem it a laudable 
and meritorious deed so to do. For history, com- 
pacted together by the histographier, extolleth, enhan- 
ceth, and lifteth up such as ben noble and virtuous ; 
depresseth, poistereth, and thrusteth down such as 
ben wicked, evil, pushful, and reprovable. What 



2 Prologue 

pleasure shall it be to the noble gentlemen of England 
to see, behold and read the high enterprises, famous 
acts and glorious deeds done and achieved in this 
time ? 

Forsooth and this hath moved me to write these 
chronicles, and though I cannot of a surety vouch that 
things were as I have set them down in this book, 
yet I trust I have not swerved from the true import 
of the matters, requiring all readers and hearers to 
take this my rude work in gre. 






CHAPTER I 

Of the further discomforts of the Buffs ; how the Earl of Durdans and 
Sir Caivmell de Bannerman met together but could not agree ; how 
Sir Cawmell would not clean his slate, and how the Earl would not 
dwell within the Tabernacle. 

YOU have already seen in the chronicles which I 
have before written how that the party of the 
Buffs in England was sore troubled, being buffeted 
by cross currents when they were at sea, and having 
no more comfort on land. When the Earl of Durdans 
came up out of the furrow which he had set himself 
to plough, and betook himself to Chesterfield to counsel 
the people what they should do, the Buffs for the 
most part hoped that their fortunes would now mend, 
and that they might be in better countenance to with- 
stand and prevail against the Blues, who had so long 
held them in subjection, which they could not in any 
wise do while they were divided among themselves. 

Indeed for a time it seemed as if matters would 
go more smoothly, and that the leaders and the 
different parties of the Buffs might draw together and 
become less contrarious one to the other, howbeit some 



4 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

there were who were sorely vexed, as I have before 
shewed you, by reason of the saying of the Earl of 
Durdans that it behoved them to clean their slates, 
holding this to be evil counsel. 




SIR TOBY DE LUC'E. 



Now much depended on what Sir Cawmell de 
Bannerman, who was the leader of the Commoners of 
the Buffs, should be minded to do, and men mused, 
saying to each other, " What will Sir Cawmell do? 



The Discomforts of the Buffs 5 

Will he wait upon the Earl of Durdans and swear 
fealty to him, or will the Earl join himself to the 
banner of Sir Cawmell ? " 

I greatly desired to know the truth of this matter 
that I might set it down in my chronicles, and, being 
in England soon after, it happily chanced that I fell 
in acquaintance with a certain knight, Sir Toby de 
Luce, who had great knowledge of affairs of state 
and was himself a maker of histories. 

He was right courteous and told me many things 
which I was covetise of learning. I demanded of him 
if the Earl of Durdans and Sir Cawmell de Banner- 
man had come together. 

He answered me, u Yes." 

Then I demanded of him the manner of their 
meeting, and in what wise they had conversed. 

"That shall I shew you," quoth he, "to the 
intent that you may put it in perpetual memory when 
you return into your own country, and have leisure 
thereto." 

I was rejoiced of his words, and thanked him ; 
then he began thus, and said, "On the Sunday before 
Christmas Day in the year of our Lord a thousand 
nine hundred and one, it fell about that Sir Cawmell 
de Bannerman chanced to find himself near a wayside 
inn, where he knew the Earl of Durdans was wont 
to lodge when he was not elsewhere. So he drew to 



6 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

the door and made inquiry whether the Earl was 
within his lodgings, but when he was answered that 
the Earl had gone to Matins and was not yet returned, 
Sir Cawmell de Bannerman departed back upon his way. 

" Now when the Earl of Durdans was told of the 
visit that Sir Cawmell had made he sent a message 
to him entreating him courteously to eat with him on 
the next day. 

"Truth it is that Sir Cawmell de Bannerman, on 
the Monday following next to the Sunday before 
Christmas Day went again to the wayside inn and sat 
down with the Earl of Durdans, and they made good 
cheer together. 

"Also they talked merrily of divers matters, such 
as the weather, and affairs in Scotland. And when 
they had made an end of talking, Sir Cawmell de 
Bannerman gave thanks to the Earl of Durdans for 
his courtesy and entertainment and so rode home 
again." 

Then I, Sir John Froissart, said, "Sir Toby, I 
believe you well," howbeit I had great marvel that these 
two, the Earl of Durdans and Sir Cawmell de Ban- 
nerman, had conversed of such light matters, and had 
not, when they met together, taken counsel what 
might be done to remedy the grievous plight of the 
Buffs. 

And of a surety I have been told by others that 



8 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

these two did converse in such manner, but that they 
could in no wise agree in the matter of the giving of 
Home Rule to the Irish, the Earl of Durdans being 
stoutly set against such enterprise on the part of the 
Buffs. 

Now I cannot say what is the truth of this matter, 
but that they could not agree altogether, or indeed at 
all, is manifest by reason of what the Earl of Durdans 
and Sir Cawmell de Bannerman thereafter said to 
their friends. 

Quoth Sir Cawmell, " Are not two parties in the 
state enough ? Where then is the need for a third ? 
Moreover I know not what counsel the Earl of 
Durdans would give us, for he does not shew us his 
ideas clearly, but in parables and metaphors which 
cannot be understood. Now he talks of spades, and 
anon of phylacteries and slates." 

And the Earl of Durdans went about saying, "The 
evils that afflict the Buffs can only be cured by spades 
and clean slates, and in no wise by methods of 
barbarism." 

This continued as I have shewed you for a two 
or three weeks, and how it came to an end I will now 
relate to you. 

On the nineteenth day of February in the year 
of our Lord a thousand nine hundred and two, a 
five days after the Feast of St. Valentine, Sir Cawmell 



The Discomforts of the Buffs 9 

de Bannerman went on a pilgrimage to Leicester to 
speak to an assembly of the Buffs who had gathered 
together there to take counsel about the affairs of the 
party. And he spoke to them in this wise : " The 
Earl of Durdans doth injustice to us in that we know 




THE EARL OF DURDANS REFUSETH TO DWELL WITHIN THE 
TABERNACLE. 

not to this day whether he is inside or outside our 
Tabernacle." 

Moreover Sir Cawmell declared that he would by 
no means clean his slate as the Earl of Durdans had 
counselled. 



io Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Now when it was shewed to the Earl of Durdans 
what Sir Cawmell de Bannerman had said, he was 
sorely, vexed. 

Quoth he, " I will give Sir Cawmell de Banner- 
man a right speedy answer. Let him know that I 
am not minded to dwell within the Tabernacle wherein 
he is pope, but shall remain outside with my clean 
slate, and thereto I will ever stand." 

These disputations and differences caused great 
discomfort to the Buffs, who were now in more 
pitiful case than they had- been even herebefore, for 
some of the Buffs, with whom, as rumour runneth, 
were Sir Henry Asquith, Sir Edward de Grey, and 
Sir Henry de Fowler, cried "A Chesterfield." Others 
there were who agreed the rather with Sir Cawmell 
de Bannerman, and these cried " A Leicester," the 
chief of whom were Sir Harcourt de Malwood and 
Sir John de Morlaix. 

But many of the Buffs were vexed greatly, saying 
that they were better without leaders than to have 
such as disputed so hotly between themselves to the 
grievous discomfort and undoing of the party, and to 
the great joy of their enemies, the Blues. 



Of Metaphors and Harmful Weapons 1 1 

How a certain man of law, Augustine de Birr ell , discoursed on the 
way of Metaphors and other harmftil weapons. 

You may well understand, as I have before told 
you, that I was greatly covetise of knowing the true 
original and foundation of all these matters which I 
have shewed you, and to that end I sought the 
company of a certain Augustine de Birrell, a man of 
law, and one of the counsellors of the King. Discreet 
he was, and full rich of excellence and of reverence. 
He had great knowledge of the affairs of the Buffs, 
by whom he was had in honour and esteem. More- 
over he excelled in wit as well as wisdom, and was 
of a merry countenance and conversation. I had 
wondrous pleasure and entertainment of his company, 
and when it fell about one day that I encountered 
him as we were the both of us riding on the road to 
Westminster, I demanded of him to know what were 
the true causes of the disputations and contrariousness 
between the Earl of Durdans and Sir Cawmell 
de Bannerman and the divers parties of the Buffs. 

First I asked of him what was the meaning of 
the slate, the cleaning whereof the Earl of Durdans 
had counselled to the vexation of Sir Cawmell de 
Bannerman and certain of his followers. 

Quoth the man of law, "You must know that 
slate is a substance which, if it be rudely handled, 



Of Metaphors and Harmful Weapons 13 

splitteth into thin sections and cannot in any wise be 
made whole again." 

Then I demanded of him where this slate might 
be found, and what was the nature of the writing 
thereon which the Earl of Durdans would have to 
be cleaned. 

" Of a truth," the man of law answered me, " I 
know not if there be any such slate, or ever was." 

I had great marvel of this and inquired how a 
slate might be cleaned if there were indeed no such 
thing. Whereupon the man of law made merry at 
my bewilderment, saying that he believed of a surety 
the slate and the tabernacle were metaphors, and 
could neither be written upon, nor cleaned, nor 
dwelt in. 

Then he shewed me what manner of thing a 
metaphor is. 

"It is," quoth he, "a figure of speech 
of contrarious and perilous creation, for it ariseth 
out of a word that hath been taken away out 
of the place to which it pertaineth of right, and is 
put where it is not clearly understood and cannot 
easily be explained." 

Upon this I demanded to know why the leaders 
of the Buffs were so sore vexed with one another 
about matters which existed not but were only figures 
of speech. He answered me, "Of a truth I cannot 



14 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

tell you, but certain it is that men are ever minded 
to quarrel more fiercely over things that are unreal 
than those that are real. And these disputations are 
not easy to make an end of, seeing that things 
which do not exist cannot in any wise be proved. 




THE EARL OF DURDANS PLAYETH AT THE GAME OF METAPHORS. 

You may well wonder that men make use of 
metaphors, for they are a sore peril to them against 
themselves." 

I demanded how this might be. The man of 
law answered me, "A metaphor is in truth a sort of 
a boomerang. This boomerang, you must know, is a 



Of Metaphors and Harmful Weapons 15 

weapon that certain wild men who dwell in lands on 
the other side of the world have great skill in using. 
When they throw it in battle it striketh the enemy 
and then straightway returneth to him from whom it 
departed. Thus the wild man saveth his weapon, but 




SIR CAWMELL DE BANNERMAN ALSO PLAYETH AT METAPHORS. 

if he be not skilled then the boomerang may chance 
to come back and do him grievous hurt. In like 
manner, when the leaders of the Buffs would do injury 
to others by metaphors, they oftentimes get the greater 
hurt themselves by reason of the recoiling back." 



1 6 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

All these things which the man of law right 
courteously shewed to me I did put in writing, 
because I would not forget them. It was a marvel- 
lous thing and of poor foundation that this mischief 
should be among the Buffs to their undoing, but I 
speak thereof as it was done and of the incidents 
thereof. 

But howbeit the leaders and the divers sections of 
the party seemed to be so contrarious one to the 
other, of a surety I am minded to think that after- all 
they did but differ as to how they might agree. 



CHAPTER II 

Of the opening of the Parliament of England by King Edward the 
Seventh; of the matters debated therein, and how Sir Arthur 
de halfour did cause a change to be made in the manner of 
procedure to the end that he and others might play at golf. 

T N the year of our Lord a thousand nine hundred 
and two, on the sixteenth day of January, on a 

Thursday, began a parliament at Westminster holden 
by King Edward the Seventh, at which time there 
were assembled princes and prelates of the realm of 
Britain to a great number, and also dukes, marquesses, 
earls, viscounts, barons, and of every shire and town 
a certain. 

Thus the people assembled at Westminster, there 
being present the King and the Queen, and there the 
King did make speech to the lords and the commons 
shewing what things the government might, could, 
would, or should be about to do, if time permitted, 

And when he had made an end of speaking the 
commoners departed to their places, some to see & how 
much might be undertaken, and others to consider 
how they might hinder them. 



c 



1 8 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Now it is to be remembered that in England the 
Blues and the Buffs, albeit they fight fiercely when 
they draw out into the country to encounter each 
other, for the most part they contend only in disputa- 
tions in the parliament house at Westminster. Therein 
the Blues sit on the right-hand side of the Lord 
High Chancellor, or Sir Speaker as the case may be, 
and the Buffs on the left-hand side. But it is 
strictly ordained that they shall in no wise, when 
they of the commons discourse, speak discourteously 
of or revile rudely those who are over against them. 
And if one should chance to do so, straightway he is 
called to order, and if he be contrarious and refuseth 
to take back that he hath said in offence, incontinent 
he is put forth and hanged for a certain time in 
accord with rules thereto made and provided. I had 
great marvel of this when it was shewed me, and 
of a surety I doubted if it were truth, for never have 
I seen this cruel business done, nor do I know the 
place of suspension unless it be done secretly in the 
clock tower that adjoineth the parliament chamber, 
and is the dungeon thereof. 

In like wise no knight or squire may wear his 
sword or other weapon when he entereth the council 
chamber. Moreover it hath been shewed me that on 
either side of the chamber where they sit there is 
drawn a line, beyond which no man when he riseth 



Affairs of Parliament 19 

to speak may adventure, and these two lines are 
apart one from the other beyond the length of a 
sword stroke, so that no evil may be done. 

Now let us speak of one or two of the divers 
matters that were debated in this parliament of the 
year of our Lord a thousand nine hundred and two. 

Firstly was there the cause of certain changes of 
procedure in the business of the chamber which were 
greatly desired by Sir Arthur de Balfour, the leader 
of the Blues in the Chamber of Commons, and who 
next to my lord of Salisbury was highest in the 
governance. He counselled that such changes should 
be made whereby the men of parliament might depart 
out of London, if such was their will, of a Friday 
afternoon. 

Quoth he, " There be many of us who have much 
business to attend to in the country of a Saturday, 
which heretofore we have been hindered in." 

In the end this was done as I have said, howbeit 
many there were who contended that it was an evil 
adventure, and that Sir Arthur de Balfour was 
minded to play and not to occupy himself with any 
business on the last day of the week. 

And they spake in this wise, " Sir Arthur de 
Balfour hath less care for the business of the realm 
than for the game of golf in which he taketh great 
pleasure. To that end he hath set himself to over- 



20 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

turn the ancient customs of Parliament to the great 
prejudice of the realm, a thing which should in no 




SIR ARTHUR DE liAI.FOUR HATH BUSINESS TO ATTEND TO IN THE 

COUNTRY. 

wise be fortuned." But, as I have told you, Sir 
Arthur de Balfour prevailed in this business, which 
o-ave great joy to those who loved pastimes. 



Affairs of Parliament 21 

For it is a marvellous thing what store these 
English set on games that are played with ball, and 
the man who striketh or kicketh a ball skilfully is 
held in regard more than if he excelled all others in 
wisdom. 

You must know that this game of golf is played 
in this wise. 




ENGLISH NOBLEiMAN PLAYING AT THE GAME OF GOLF. 

A man goeth forth having with him a boy who 
beareth a bag full of clubs of divers and strange 
shapes. Then the man putteth down on the grass a 
small white ball which he smiteth, or essayeth to 
smite, with one of the clubs, to the end that he may 
cause it to fall into a hole in the ground 

o 

The fewer strokes that the player hath need to 
make the more joy he hath, but if, when he striketh, 



22 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

the ball goeth only a little way off, or falleth by hazard 
into a thorn bush or a ditch, he muses sorely, and 
oftentimes sweareth horribly. And this game of golf, 
as I have been informed, taketh a man in like manner 
as a fever, which, when once it entereth into the veins, 
ever increaseth in violence. If a man play not well 
when he essayeth the first time, he hath hope that he 
will do better the next time, and so continueth. And 
if he play well the first time, then he thinketh himself 
to be of great puissance, and so is encouraged. In 
England, as you may well believe, this game of golf 
is held in great honour, and among those who take 
pleasure therein are many nobles of high degree and 
puissance in the governance, and this was right well 
apparent when the Parliament of England set itself to 
change its ancient laws of procedure as I have shewed 
you. 

Hoiv the English^ being desirous of buying horses for the army in 
Africa^ sent certain knights and squires abroad for that business , 
and of the animals that they bought. 

Another matter there was that was much debated 
in Parliament, and that had caused great murmuring. 
This was the business of the buying of horses for the 
war in Africa, of which I shall presently speak. You 
must know that when they of the governance of the 
Blues were informed that their enemies, against whom 



Buying Horses for the Army 23 

they were fighting, rode on horses, incontinent they 
hasted to procure some for their own army, and to 
this end they sent certain knights and squires abroad 
to buy whatsoever animals they might imagine to be 
horses. 

Now, when these tidings anon spread in Frankfort, 




ENGLISH SQUIRE BUYING HORSES FOR THE ARMY IN AFRICA. 

(Remount Records.} 

and Buda Pesth, and Judaea, the copers and all those 
who made profit by buying and selling accorded 
together that they should get great advantage from 
this business. And of a truth I believe well that they 
did so, for wheresoever the English knights or squires, 
who were commissioned in this business, arrived and 



24 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

caused to be known the reason of their coming, the 
horse-dealers and copers and gipsies came thither to 
themward with multitudes of animals, which, so they 
said, were horses. Whether this was so or not I 




SIR BLUNDELL DE MAPLE PROTESTETH THAT TOWEL-HORSES WOULD 
HAVE BETTER SERVED THE ARMY THAN THE HORSES THAT HAD 
BEEN BOUGHT IN HUNGARY. 



(Remount Records?) 



cannot of a surety say, but, as I have been in- 
formed, the English knights and squires purchased all 
the animals that were brought to them that had four 
legs. And if it fortuned that they refused any animal 
because it bore only three legs, then that same animal 



Buying Horses for the Army 25 

was brought to them again at night and sold. All 
these things were alleged by those who found fault 
with the governance, and indeed I well believe them, 
for it was shewed to me that for the most part the 
horses that were obtained in this wise fell in pieces, 
or brake in two when the soldiers in Africa would 
have ridden on them. This business was a grievous 
scandal and a great prejudice to the army and to the 
realm, for by it the war endured for a long season, 
seeing that the English could not overtake and make 
prisoners of their enemies. 

Many even of the Blues were sore vexed, saying 
that things were not as well done by the governance 
as they should be ; and among those who murmured 
in this wise was a certain knight, Sir Blundell de 
Maple, who had great knowledge of horses. Quoth 
he, " Marry, but they had better have sent towel- 
horses to Africa than the animals that they have 
bought in Frankfort, and Buda Pesth, and Judaea." 



CHAPTER III 

Of the orgulous words spoken by a lord of Almaine ; how Sir Joseph 
de Birmingham answered in like manner, of the repute he gained 
thereby, and how he went into the city of London, and was there 
received ivith great favour. 

IT might well be imagined, seeing the war in Africa 
was not yet made an end of, and that the cost 
thereof was a heavy burden on the people, and many 
still continued to be killed or sore hurt, that Sir 
Joseph de Birmingham would have been held in less 

reo-ard than heretofore. Indeed, this for a time was 
& 

as I have said, and ill might it have fortuned him but 
for an adventure which I will relate to you. 

A certain lord of Almaine, called Von Bulow, spake 
orgulous words to Sir Joseph de Birmingham, saying 
that it behoved him not to be so presumptuous. For 
you must know that Sir Joseph had said that the 
English were no more cruel in the war they were 
making against the Dutch in Africa than the Almains 
had been when they fought with and overcame the 
French. 



Sir Joseph goeth to the City 27 

When Sir Joseph de Birmingham heard how the 

lord Von Bulow spake, he regarded him right fiercely 

and felly, and defied him. Quoth he, " What I have 




SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM DEFIETH THE LORD VON BULOW 
OF ALMAINE. 

said I have said, nor will I any wise withdraw back 
from nor qualify. I desire not to teach manners to 
foreign lords, neither will I suffer any such to teach 



28 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

me. I owe no allegiance, but all only to my own 
rightful lord King Edward the Seventh, and I am 
responsible to none but my own countrymen of Bir- 
mingham and England, therefore am I not minded to 
suffer orgulous counsel that is made in Almaine." 

This defiance of the lord of Almaine by Sir Joseph 
de Birmingham gave great joy to the English, par- 
ticularly to the Blues within the city of London, and 
these said that Sir Joseph had done well in so speak- 
ing, and deserved that he should be enrolled as a 
citizen, and that a casket of gold should be given to 
him. 

And so on the thirteenth day of February, on a 
Thursday in the year of our Lord a thousand nine 
hundred and two, on the day before the Feast of St. 
Valentine, Sir Joseph with his squires and retainers 
rode to the cityward and so to the Guildhall, where 
was a great assembly of the Lord Mayor and his 
Aldermen, and his Sheriffs, and his City Marshal, the 
which was apparelled so that it was a marvel to see, 
besides a fair rout of citizens. And they all made 
obeisance to Sir Joseph de Birmingham, and greatly 
recommended him for that he had withstood the lord 
of Germany. 

They had, moreover, been minded, as it hath been 
shewed me, to present to him a casket of gold, but 
it fortuned that this had not yet been made, and so 



30 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

the Lord Mayor excused himself and pledged his faith 
that whensoever the casket was delivered from the 
hands of the goldsmiths they would send it to him by 
a trusty messenger. And when they had all made an 
end of speaking, the Lord Mayor and his Aldermen, 
and his Sheriffs, and his Counsellors, and the City 
Marshal, and divers of the burgesses and commonty 
of the city did conduct Sir Joseph de Birmingham to 
the Mayor's lodging, where was spread a great feast, 
and there they made Sir Joseph good cheer with 
many turtles and much white wine and red. 

It was a marvel how greatly in this wise was Sir 
Joseph de Birmingham honoured in the city of London, 
and none durst speak against anything he had done. 
Thus Sir Joseph, for all he might have been thought 
to be in peril of losing favour with the people, was 
of greater puissance than he had ever been hereto- 
fore. 



CHAPTER IV 

Of the war in Africa, how the lord de Kitchener caused many castles to be 
builded, and how a certain flying Dutchman could not be caught. 

LET us now speak of the war in Africa, which 
continued after it had been ended. When 
the Earl de Bobs departed on his viage back to 
England, the lord de Kitchener led the English army, 
and daily there were scrimmishes made with the 
Dutch, and men slain on both parties and prisoners 
taken. The Dutch shewed great hardness and fought 
with great honour ; the Englishmen were many more 
in numbers, howbeit, I say not but they did nobly 
acquit themselves. 

But you must know that Africa is a large country, 
and it was sore travail to the English to safeguard 
their convoys with victuals and purveyances, and to 
search out where the Dutchmen w r ere assembled so 
that they might force them to fight in the plain field. 
For the Dutch were so well horsed that they were 
able to escape whensoever they would, and the 
English could in no wise overtake them. 

When the lord de Kitchener perceived this matter 
clearly he caused to be builded a great number of 



32 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

little castles, a mile apart each from the other, and 
these were joined together by fences of wire in the 
which were woven sharpened barbs. These castles 
were set all round about the country on all sides, to 
the intent to hold the Dutch within in manner as if 
besieged, for the English could not overcome them 
thereas as they were. And when the English, as they 
thought, had encompassed the Dutch wholly in this 
wise they drew forward to drive them so that they 
might make prisoners of them. 

Some prisoners, indeed, were taken, but it was 
great marvel how swift the Dutch were on their horses 
and how they avoided the English and so escaped. 

Thus continually the English were fain to make 
watch, and to send out scoutwatches a mile off to 
see ever if any such people as they were informed of 
were coming to themward, to the intent that if their 
scoutwatch heard any noise or moving of people, 
then incontinent they should give them knowledge, 
whereby they might quickly haste together where 
they weened the Dutch might be. 

Now there was a certain De Wet, one of the 
chief leaders of the Dutch, of great skill in war, of 
high pride and bobance, 1 and of marvellous courage, 
and oftentimes he did great damage to the English 
by sudden excursions. 

1 Confidence. 



The War in Africa 33 

But the English, for all that he withstood them 
so stoutly, held him in high repute, and in England, 
as I have been told, it was a common jangle among 
the people to enquire of one another, " Is De Wet 
yet made a prisoner of?" 

I will now speak of a certain notable adventure, 




DE WET. 



the like of which I ween had not been done sith 
the days of Hannibal. It was in this wise. 

The Englishmen were chasing De Wet, following 
hard upon him, and he was in great peril of being 
taken, seeing that the fence of wire was in front, 
and the English behind. 

D 



34 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Then he mused sorely how he might escape, and 
anon he bethought himself of a way. So he gathered 




DE WET ESCAPETH THROUGH THE FENCE. 

together a great herd of oxen and, putting himself* 
and those that were with him in the midst, they 



The War in Africa 35 

affrayed the beasts so that they ran violently and 
brake down the fence, and so for the most part 
escaped ; howbeit some of the Dutchmen there were 
who were slain in the adventure. 

This the Dutch did a two or three times, so that 
it was a marvel to the English. 

Of the evil fortune that befell the lord Paul de Methuen, how he was sore 
hurt and taken prisoner, and how the Dutch showed him marvellous 
courtesy. 

It irks me to tell of the evil fortune that befell the 
lord Paul de Methuen, one of the leaders of the 
English in the war in Africa, but, though the adven- 
ture was sore displeasant to the good people of 
England, I cannot forget or abridge my history in 
anything, seeing that I have set myself to the 
intent to shew you plainly matters as they were. It 
chanced that the lord Paul, being on a viage with his 
army, lodged for the night at a place called Twee- 
bosch. And the next morning at sunrise the vaward 
advanced forward on the way, and after they had 
gone a league or more then the lord Paul commanded 
that the carts and charettes drawn by oxen should follow. 

Also he ordained that there should be a rearband, 
and scurrers r who should ride apart on both wings 
to the intent that if they escried the enemy they 
should give the lord Paul knowledge of the matter. 

1 Scouts. 



36 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

This was accomplished as it had been ordained, 
but when presently the rearband perceived a host of 
the Dutch riding furiously to encounter them they, 
for the most part, did not abide puissantly, but re- 




THE LORD PAUL DE METHUEN. 

culed them aback without good array among the 
carts and charettes and the oxen. Thus was there 
so great a confusion set up that the lord Paul could in 
no wise remedy it, and so the Dutch, whose captain 
was one De la Rey, a soldier of great skill and 



The War in Africa 37 

courage, brake in upon the English and slew and 
made prisoners of a great many. 

The lord Paul himself, albeit he fought valiantly, 
as he was ever wont to do, was grievously hurt and 
unhorsed, and fell into the hands of the Dutch. 
Howbeit the Dutch treated him and those that they 
had taken right courteously, and tended them that 
were wounded. And a day or two after they con- 
veyed the lord Paul to the English camp and yielded 
him up, which, I trow, was a deed of great noblesse 
and gentleness. 

Pity it was that the lord Paul de Methuen, who 
had fought from the beginning of the war, should 
meet with this evil fortune. And this was the more 
pity because the war was so soon afterwards made 
an end of, as I shall shew you presently. 

All such as in cruel battles have been seen abiding 
to the discomfiture, sufficiently doing their devoir, 
may well be reputed for valiant and hardy, whatso- 
ever was their adventure. 

Of the death of Sir Cecil de Kimberley of Africa, and of the Earl of 
Kimberley of Norfolk in England. 

In the mean season between the adventures in 
Africa, of which I have herebefore told you, and the 
ending of the war, it fell about that there departed 
out of this world two notable Englishmen, howbeit 



38 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

of different conditions. The one was Sir Cecil de 
Kimberley, who was of great puissance in Africa, 
and who had been the chief of the Free Company of 
Charterland, until the evil adventure of the upsetting 




DE LA REY. 



of his apple cart, of which I have already spoken in 
the first book of my chronicles. 

Many there were in England who were sore 
abashed by the adventure and greatly blamed Sir 
Cecil for it. 



The Death of Sir Cecil de Kimberley 39 

But when he fell sick and the sickness continued 
so long that it was plainly seen there was no remedy, 
all men accorded that it was great pity this was so,' 
for though he had not always been wise in his enter- 
prises, yet he loved England greatly and desired her 
puissance. 

He died in Africa in the year of our Lord a 
thousand nine hundred and two, on the twenty-sixth 
day in the month of March, and his body was carried 
into Charterland, and there was he buried in the 
Mountains of Matoppo. 

And there were present at the burying many of 
the natives of the land who grieved sorely that Sir 
Cecil de Kimberley, whom they called the Great 
White Chief, had departed from them. 

And in the same year of our Lord on the eighth 
day of the month of April, there passed out of this 
mortal life the Earl of Kimberley of Norfolk in 
England, one of the leaders of the party of the 
Buffs, of great virtuousness and high repute. 

He bare for arms, sable : a chevron or, gutte de 
sang, between three cinquefoils ermine, and for crest a 
dexter arm couped below the elbow, vested argent, 
and grasping a club or. And he bare for motto 
" Frappe Fort." 



CHAPTER V 

How the war in Africa was made an end of to the great joy of the 
English and the Dutch. 

LET us now speak of the manner that the war in 
Africa that continued after it had been ended 
was at last made an end of. You may well believe 
that the English, howbeit they were in no wise minded 
to withdraw aback from the enterprise, but had set 
themselves other by fairness or by vigour to bring 
the Dutch to accord or to overcome them, were sore 
vexed at their fumishness, 1 and that they would still 
continue to fight felly and w r ould not yield them. 

Now, though I cannot of a surety vouch for the truth 
of all the things that I have set down in this high 
and excellent history, yet have I recorded nothing 
that has not been plainly shewed me by those right 
well able to speak by the true report. 

You must know that King Edward the Seventh of 
England had caused a proclamation to be made 
throughout the land that on the Thursday in the 

1 Obstinacy. 

4 o 



The Ending of the War 41 

month of June, on the twenty-sixth day of the month, 
in the year of our Lord a thousand nine hundred and 
two, he would go in state with the Queen to the 
Abbey Church of Westminster to the intent that they 





THE KING DESIRETH THAT AN END MAY BE MADE OF THE 
WAR IN AFRICA. 



might there be crowned by the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury and the Archbishop of York. 

Also he caused to be sent messages to the noble 
and great lords and ladies, and divers others, com- 



4-2 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

manding them to attend on the day appointed, and 
bidding them to come beseen in such manner as by 
right pertained to them. 

The King, of a truth, was minded that there should 
be nothing lacking to the end that this coronation 
should be a right noble and glorious pageant. 




DE LA KEY, BOTHA, AND DE WET JOURNEY TO VEREENIGING. 

It irked him that England might still be at war 
when the day came, and he sorely mused how peace 
might be attained. 

So he desired that Sir Joseph de Birmingham 
might be sent for, and when he had come and had 
made obeisance the King demanded of him what 



The Ending of the War 43 

might be done to this end, saying, " Now is the time 
come to have an end of this war." I cannot tell you 
what was the answer that Sir Joseph de Birmingham 
made, or indeed if this was in any wise as I have 
related, but I will continue to believe it until better 
reason to the contrary hath been shewed me. 

Certain it is that a little time after news came 
from Africa that there were truchemen going to and 
fro between the English and the Dutch. 

The Dutchmen at the first were contrarious, 
demanding conditions to which the lord de Kitchener 
would not accord, but in a two or three weeks it fell 
about that De Botha, De Wet, De la Rey, and 
others of the chief men of the Dutch came together 
to a place called Vereeniging, and there they con- 
ferred with the lord de Kitchener and the lord de 
Milner. 

Now the Dutch greatly liked the lord de Kitchener, 
for all that he had fought against them with great 
hardness and valiance, and had much discomforted 
them. 

But the lord de Milner they misliked somewhat, 
for they deemed him to be orgulous. 

The lord de Kitchener conversed right pleasantly 
with the Dutch captains, so that they inclined to make 
peace and to swear fealty to King Edward. And 
whensoever he saw that De Wet or any other of the 



44 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Dutchmen was cast down, and not at his ease, he 
would smite him merrily on the shoulder, saying, 
" Have good cheer, sir, be not so melancholious." 




THE LORD DE MILNER IS DEEMED 
TO BE ORGULOUS. 



This gave great offence to the lord de Milner, 
and he counselled the lord de Kitchener to be not 



The Ending of the War 4.5 

so familious with the Dutchmen, but to bear himself 
with more dignity as beseemed him. 

But the lord de Kitchener made merry at this. 

Quoth he, " This is my business. I have done 
the fighting heretofore, therefore let me now make an 
end of it, for such is my right." 




THE LORD DE KITCHENER COMFORTETH DE WET. 

This was sore displeasant to the lord de Milner, 
as I have been informed. Also it hath been shewed 
me that he sent letters to the governance in England 
making great murmuration that the lord de Kitchener 
should deal in this wise with the Dutch. 

But the governance answered that they had great 



46 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

affiance in the lord de Kitchener, and that it was 
behoveful to let him do as he would. 

And so after many conferences at Vereeniging the 
Dutch captains bethought them that they would go 
back to their companies to give them knowledge of 
the conditions they might obtain from the English, if 
they yielded themselves up and made an end of resist- 
ance. 

This was done as I have said, and when De 
Botha, De Wet, De la Rey, and the others of the 
Dutch leaders had shewed the whole matter plainly 
to the companies, these agreed that they would accept 
the conditions that the lord de Kitchener and the 
lord de Milner had made, and that they would swear 
fealty to King Edward the Seventh, holding them- 
selves from thenceforth to be subject to him, and to 
be no longer subject to Oom Paul and Steyn as 
heretofore. 

And so at midnight on a Saturday, the seventh 
day of June, in the year of our Lord a thousand nine 
hundred and two, the lord de Kitchener and the 
lord de Milner for the English, and the others of 
whom I have spoken, for the Dutch, set their seals 
to a covenant that the Dutch should surrender their 
arms, and that the English should not confisc nor put 
any to death, but should reedify the dwellings that 
had been brent or destroyed during the war. 



The Ending of the War 47 

And in this wise there was made an end of the 
war in Africa that had been begun on the eleventh 
day of October, in the year of our Lord a thousand 
eight hundred ninety and nine. 

This agreement was right pleasant both to the 
English and the Dutch, and great were the rejoicings 
thereat in England and her dominions. 

And great honour was given to all who had done 
their devoir, fighting hardly and with great valiance 
on both sides. 



CHAPTER VI 

How King Ediuard, after that he had appointed a day for his Corona- 
tion^ fell grievously sick, and of his marvellous recovery from his 
malady. 

YE have heard herebefore how that King Edward 
the Seventh of Great Britain and Ireland and 
of all the Empire over the seas had decreed that he 
should be crowned, with Queen Alexandra, on the 
twenty-sixth day of the month of June. Great were 
the preparations made therefor, and princes and nobles 
of high degree, and people came from divers parts of 
the world to London. 

In every street where it was ordained that the 
King and Queen would pass on the day appointed for 
the Coronation, and on the day following, when the 
intent of the King was to go in procession with great 
state through London, there were set up arches richly 
beseen, and banners, so that it was a pleasure to 
behold. And on every side there were builded great 
stages for the people who were minded to pay that 
they might see the procession at their ease, and these 
stages were so high that there was nothing that could 






Sickness and Recovery of the King 49 

be seen above them but only the sky and the spires 
and towers of the churches. 

And so great a rout of citizens was assembled in 
the streets of London in this season that it was a 
marvel to see, for they said one to the other, " This 
is a business we are never, like to behold again, 
therefore let us make the most of it, for Kings and 
Queens are not crowned every day." 

But a two or three days before the day that had 
been appointed for the Coronation there fell about 
a right grievous thing, by the which the rejoicing- 
was of a sudden turned into mourning for a time. 

For it fortuned evilly that the King fell sore sick 
and betook himself to his bed, and the most skilled 
chirurgeons in the land were summoned to the Palace 
of Buckingham where he lay, and by reason of this 
it was shewed to the people that in no wise could the 
King be crowned as had been decreed on the twenty- 
sixth day of June. 

Right sorrowful were the people when this was 
made known to them, for they feared that there was 
no remedy for the King, and all the preparations and 
festivities were made an end of. 

But by the great skill of the physicians and 
chirurgeons, and specially of Sir Frederick de Treves, 
who was of great repute in curing the malady of which 
the King suffered, it happily fortuned that he made 



50 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

a marvellous recovery, to the great joy and thankful- 
ness of all the people. 

How the King and Queen were afterwards crowned in the great 
church of the Abbey of Westminster. 

When the King had recovered of his sickness he 
appointed a day again when he would be crowned 
and sacred, and this was on the ninth day of August, 
in the year of our Lord a thousand nine hundred and 
two. 

And on that day King Edward and the Queen, 
his wife, daughter of the King of Denmark, went to 
the great church of the Abbey at Westminster, where 
was assembled prelates and nobles of the realm, and 
gentlemen of high estate, with their ladies all beseen 
in rich apparel of fur and velvet. And all the nobles 
and their wives carried with them their coronets in 
their hands, for it was not seemly to wear them on 
their heads until after that the King and Queen had 
been rightly crowned. 

I will now set myself to shew you all the solemni- 
ties that were performed in the Church on that day. 

There was firstly the procession of the Princes 
and Princesses of the blood Royal with their pages 
and trainbearers, and these were conducted to their 
appointed places by the heralds. 

The second procession was of the Royal guests, 
and among these were the Grand Duke of Hesse. 



Crowning of the King and Queen 51 

in Almaine, the Prince Henry of Almaine and his 
Princess, the Crown Prince of Denmark, the Duke 
and the Duchess of Sparta, Prince George and 
Prince Andrew of Greece, and the Crown Prince 
and Princess of Roumania, all of whom were related 
in blood to the King or Queen. 

The third procession was of the Prince and 
Princess of Wales, the son and daughter-in-law of 
King Edward. 

Then there came into the Church the King's 
chaplain, and the Dean and Canons of Westminster. 
And among those who followed in order were the 
King's Champion bearing the Standard of England, 
and the four Knights of the Garter appointed to 
assist in the anointing, wearing their mantles of blue 
velvet, and the Archbishop of Canterbury and the 
Archbishop of York richly apparelled in copes of 
white damask broidered with gold. 

Thereafter came Queen Alexandra, whose beauty 
was right pleasant to behold, and she had on either 
hand the Bishop of Oxford and the Bishop of 
Norwich, and behind walked her Maids-of- Honour. I 
trow that never before had been beholden so great 
and marvellous beauty and magnificence. 

Next there came the King in his crimson robe of 
State, and wearing his Cap of Maintenance on his 
head, and with him were the great nobles and officers 



52 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

of State bearing the crowns, and the Orb, and the 




PLAYING AT THE ORGAN IN THE ABBEY CHURCH OF WESTMINSTER. 

{Coronation Records?) 



Sceptres of the Cross and the Dove, and the Swords 
of Justice and Mercy, and the Golden Spurs. 



Crowning of the King and Queen 53 

And there was great playing at the organ, and 
all the assembly did reverence. 

Then the King and Queen sat down on their 




THE LORD DE HALSBURY AND THE DUKE OF NORFOLK. 

(From a Stained-glass Window?) 

chairs in the Sanctuary, and the Archbishop of 
Canterbury presented the King to the nobles and the 
assembly. And they all acclaimed him with one voice, 
and cried out, " God save King Edward the Seventh ! " 



54 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Then the Archbishop administered the Oath to 
the King, and when this was made an end of the 
Lord Chamberlain aided the King to strip off his 




THE EARL OF DURDANS AND THE EARL DE SPENCER. 

(From a Stained-glass Window?) 

crimson robe and his Cap of Maintenance, and to 
seat himself in the ancient Chair of Coronation, over 
which was stretched a canopy of cloth of gold, 



Crowning of the King and Queen 55 

supported at the four corners, each by a noble 
Knight of the Order of the Garter. These four 




THE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY AND THE DEAN OF WESTMINSTER. 

(Coronation Records.) 

knights were the Earl de Spencer, the Earl of 

Durdans, the Earl of Derby, and the Earl Cadogan. 

Then the Archbishop of Canterbury and the 



56 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Dean of Westminster anointed the King with holy 
oil from the sacred Ampulla. 

Next the King had put upon him the priestly 




THE DUKE DE MALBROUK AND THE LORD DE LONDONDERRY. 

(From a Stained-glass Window?) 

vestments of the rochet and the super-tunic, and the 
Sword of State, which the Lord de Londonderry 
carried, was girded on his side, and the Orb, and 



Crowning of the King and Queen 57 

the Sceptres, and the Golden Spurs, and the Ring 
were presented to him. 

Then the Archbishop put the Crown upon the 
King's head, and all the assembly cried again, " God 
save the King ! " and the trumpeters blew upon their 
trumpets. 

And as soon as the King had been crowned, 
incontinent all the nobles put their coronets upon 
their heads and did homage. And when the organ 
had been played again the assembly shouted, "God 
save King Edward! Long live King Edward! May 
the King live for ever ! " 

When this had been accomplished the Archbishop 
of York put the Crown upon the head of the Queen, 
and all the wives of the nobles put their coronets on, 
and it has been told me that some of them were 
sore troubled how to do this so that the coronets 
would remain and not fall to the ground, which would 
have sore abashed them. 

And when an end had been made of all the 
solemnities and ceremonies of which I have spoken 
the King and Queen departed back from the Church 
to their Palace of Buckingham. 

And there was great rejoicing among the people 
that this business, though it had been so grievously 
hindered for a time, was now so happily accom- 
plished. 



CHAPTER VII 

Of the journey that Sir Dickon Seddon made from Maori land to 
Africa, how he conversed with the lord de Kitchener, and how 
he hastily departed from Africa and sailed to England. 

NOW let us leave somewhat to speak of the 
adventures of a certain Sir Dickon Seddon, 
the which are a great marvel, as I shall shew you. 
Now, Sir Dickon Seddon was of great puissance, by 
reason of his pushfulness, in the island wherein he 
dwelt, the name of which, as I have been informed, 
is Maoriland. It lieth in an ocean on the other side 
of the world, and belongeth to England, howbeit it 
hath its own governance. And of this governance 
Sir Dickon Seddon was chief. He was a knight of 
great spirit, and had so great belief in himself that it 
was a wonder to all men, for he would say to those 
around him, " Things are not well with the realm of 
England, nor will be until Sir Dickon ruleth the 
roast." 

When King Edward the Seventh made prepara- 
tions for his crowning he caused invitations to be 

sent to every part of the kingdom, even beyond the 

58 



The Journey of Sir Dickon Seddon 59 

seas, bidding the chief men of every land to journey 
to London that they might attend him at Westminster 
on the day appointed for the Coronation. 

Even had it not been so I trow that Sir Dickon 




SIR DICKON SEDDON ON HIS VIAGE TO AFRICA AND ENGLAND. 

Seddon would have gone there, for he greatly desired 
that he should not be overlooked. Of a truth he did 
not journey straight to England, but caused the ship 
in which he sailed to be steered first to Africa, being 



60 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

minded to see how it fortuned that the war in that 
country still continued, and had not been made an 
end of. 

"I will look into this business," quoth he, "for 
meseemeth that the English are not bestirring them- 
selves as they ought to do, and are not fighting 
against these Dutch rebels as felly as I would have 
them do. They are too pitiful ; let them entrust the 
ordering of the war to me and to my Maoris, and 
we will right speedily roll over the land and crush 
these pestilent Dutchmen. By St. Jingo but I will 
have no conditions for their surrendering themselves." 

In this wise spake Sir Dickon Seddon, and he 
sent messengers before him to Africa and to England, 
saying, " Thus and thus hath Sir Dickon Seddon 
spoken." 

Now you must know that in Maoriland they set 
great store by sheep, the wool thereof they send 
abroad for profit, and the meat they send to England 
where it has been sold for Scottish mutton, as it has 
been told to me. 

Sir Dickon would have had those in England to 
buy no other mutton but that which came from 
Maoriland, saying, " Wherein is the profit of having 
a Motherland if she buy not that which her children 
have to sell ? " 

So when Sir Dickon Seddon arrived in Africa 



The Journey of Sir Dickon Seddon 61 

incontinent he set out to journey up the country to 
find the lord de Kitchener. And whensoever he 




SIR DICKON SEDDON PERFORMETH A WAR-DANCE AFTER 
THE MANNER OF THE MEN OF MAORILAND. 



encountered any of the English army by the way he 
demanded of them to know whether they had yet 
made peace with the Dutch, charging them stoutly 



62 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

that in no wise should they yield anything to their 
enemies. 

" Wherefore should we sacrifice that which we 
have striven so hard to gain ? " quoth he. 




SIR DICKON SEDDON DEMANDETH TO KNOW IF THE LORD DE 
KITCHENER HATH NEED OF MORE MUTTON FOR THE ENGLISH 
ARMY IN AFRICA. 



Then would he paint his face in the manner of 
the men of Maoriland and dance a war-dance to give 
countenance to the soldiers. 

When Sir Dickon Seddon arrived at the place 



Sir Dickon Seddon in Africa 63 

where the lord de Kitchener was encamped with his 
army he set himself to hold converse with him, and 
when he found where his tent was within the camp, 
he betook himself thitherward. Now the lord de 




THE LORD DE KITCHENER ANSWERETH SIR DICKON SEDDON, 
WHO DEPARTETH IN HASTE. 



Kitchener was seated therein planning how he might 
build more castles if it should fortune that the con- 
ferences with the Dutch should be made an end of 
without peace, and he was sore amazed when Sir 
Dickon Seddon presented himself demanding to know 



64 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

if he wanted more mutton from Maoriland for the 
army. 

When the lord de Kitchener answered him nay, 
Sir Dickon said that it rather behoved him to have 
said Yea, seeing that it would have gone hardly with 
the Mother country if her children from Maoriland 
had not made great sacrifices to save her from the 
Dutch in Africa. 

Moreover he charged the lord de Kitchener that 
he should not entertain any terms with the Dutch 
rebels without taking counsel with him, Sir Dickon. 

Now what reply the lord de Kitchener made to 
this I cannot of a surety tell, but it has been shewed 
me that Sir Dickon Seddon made a sudden end of 
speaking, and departed with great haste for his ship, 
saying that he might well have deemed he was 
anywhere but on English land. 

Of the further marvellous adventures of Sir Dickon Seddon^ how he 
counselled Sir Joseph de Birmingham and others in England, 
and the end thereof. 

Anon Sir Dickon Seddon continued on his viage 
to England, for he held that the King could not 
rightly be crowned if he were not there at the 
appointed time. And when his ship had taken land 
in England he hastened on shore and went straight- 
way to London. Here he was received with great 



Sir Dickon Seddon in England 65 

honour, and the King sent to him horses and servants 
richly apparelled in scarlet and gold, whereat Sir 




SIR DICKON SEDDON IN LONDON. 



Dickon Seddon was mightily pleased, saying to him- 
self, " The King doth well to honour me in this wise, 

F 



66 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

for of a surety this realm could not continue without 
me." 

And Sir Dickon Seddon rode to and fro in 
England in state as though he had been a Prince, 
telling the people everywhere what they should do if 
they desired to prosper. Moreover he counselled 
them that they should make haste to wake up and 




SIR DICKON SEDDON CONVERSETH WITH SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM. 

see to it that no other mutton 'should be allowed to 
be brought into the country save only that from 
Maoriland. 

He spake in this wise also to Sir Joseph de 
Birmingham, saying, " Thus and thus should the 
Mother country do if she would continue in the love 
of her children." 



Sir Dickon Seddon in England 67 

When Sir Dickon Seddon had thus spoken many 
times Sir Joseph de Birmingham answered that it 
behoved not children to teach their mothers the art 
of obtaining nutriment either from eggs or mutton. 

Sir Dickon was sore vexed that they of the 
governance in England gave so little heed to his 
counsel, for he was full of marvellous opinions. 
Howbeit he dissimuled the matter, avowing that he 
would still continue to love the Mother country, and 
when the King had been crowned, as I have here- 
before shewed you, Sir Dickon Seddon journeyed 
back to Maoriland across the seas. 

And thereafter whatsoever thing was devised or 
done in England, Sir Dickon Seddon would say, " Of 
a surety this was done on the counsel that I gave to 
Sir Joseph de Birmingham and others in England. 



CHAPTER VIII 

How my lord of Salisbury withdrew himself from the governance with 
Sir Michael le Noir, and Sir Arthur de Balfour became the Captain 
of the J3!ues, and how Austen de Birmingham was raised up and 
Jesse de Collings was put aside. 

IN the mean season, in the month of July in the 
same year of our Lord a thousand nine hundred 
and two, there fell about certain changes in the 
governance of England, of which I will now speak. 

My lord of Salisbury had been chief of the Blues 
for a great space, as ye have heard before, but seeing 
that he was now aged he greatly desired to be free 
from the burdens of governance. Moreover he had 
great love for Alchemy, in which he had so great 
and marvellous skill that he could, whensoever he 
willed, conjure up any images that he was minded 
to see. 

These visons of my lord of Salisbury were a 
great marvel to the others of the chief men of the 
Blues, and sore perplexed them, for they could never 
be sure what strange images might cross his mind, 



68 



Of Changes in the Governance 69 

or if what he might see would accord with their 
intent. 

But they durst not question him, for he would 
gibe at and flout those who withstood him. Howbeit 
he was greatly reputed for his wisdom in counsel, 
and when it was bruited abroad that he was minded 
to withdraw himself from the Captaincy of the Blues, 




MY LORD OF SALISBURY AND SIR MICHAEL LE NOIR DEPART FROM 
THE GOVERNANCE OF THE BLUES. 



there were many who made murmuration, saying that 
without my lord of Salisbury things would go ill 
with the governance and the realm. 

But he would not be persuaded from his intent, 
and, the ship of the Blues being in a certain measure 
at sea, he departed therefrom and went on shore and 
so to Hatfield. 



70 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

There was another of the chief men of the Blues, 
Sir Michael le Noir, whose business it was to tax 
the people and to gather in money for the Exchequer. 
But so fast as ever he filled the bag, so quickly was 
it ever emptied again, seeing that the war in Africa 
was a marvellous expense, and moreover he had to 




JESSE DE COLLINGS RETURNETH BACK TO HIS THREE ACRES 
AND HIS COW. 



provide divers doles and to maintain the King's 
ships. 

Now you must know that Sir Michael le Noir 
was sore vexed that he could not contrive to keep 
any money in the Exchequer, and he was displeasant 
to the other chiefs of the Blues when they demanded 
anything of him out of the bag. 

When Sir Michael knew that my lord of Salisbury 



Of Changes in the Governance 71 

was minded to leave the ship, incontinent he resolved 
that he would go away with him, for he was weary 
of the great waste made by the governance in the 
seven years that they had ruled in England. So my 
lord of Salisbury departed with Sir Michael le Noir 
in a boat, and his nephew Sir Arthur de Balfour, 
howbeit he was a commoner, was made the Captain 
of the Blues. 

And about the same time there fell about other 
changes. Austen de Birmingham, who was the son 
of Sir Joseph de Birmingham, was made chief over 
a department and one of the King's counsellors, 
whereat Sir Joseph and his people of Birmingham 
were greatly pleased. 

But truth it is, and it irks me to tell, that Jesse 
de Collings was put aside, though he also came from 
Birmingham, which was a marvel that all men 
wondered at, and he departed from the governance 
and went back to dig in his three acres and to watch 
over his cow. 

Jesse de Collings was right sorrowful, as I have 
been told, but Sir Joseph de Chamberlain recomforted 
him, saying that he would one day make a lord 
of him. 



CHAPTER IX 

How the English and the A/mains were contrarious one to the other, 
and how the Emperor of Almaine came to England to visit his 
uncle King Edward. 

IN the month of November of this same year the 
Emperor Wilhelm of Almaine, who was a nephew 
of King Edward, came to England to the castle of 
Sandringham in Norfolk, where his uncle was 
sojourning. 

Howbeit it is no marvel that there should be 
natural affection between an uncle and a nephew, yet 
I ween that when Emperors and Kings converse with 
each other they are minded to hold treaty together 
about the business of their realms. 

Now you must know that the people of Almaine 
were minded to be contrarious to the people of Eng- 
land, because of the war in Africa, for they feigned 
to love the Dutch, saying that England had done an 
evil thing in warring against them. 

This was sore displeasant to the English, and so it 
fell about that there were disputations between the 



The King's Guests 73 

two peoples. The Almains said that the English had 
done great felony in Africa in that they had brent, 
exiled, robbed, wasted, and pilled the good plentiful 
lands of the Transvaal and the Free State, by which 
they were infamed. 

And whensoever the English spake of the Almains 
they were disdainous, saying, " Ah, Saint Jingo, how 
these Almains are mounted in pride. They speak 
discourteously of us but by envy of our greater glory." 

This contrariousness on both sides was sore travail 
both to King Edward and to the Emperor Wilhelm 
of Almaine, and they set themselves to appease their 
people. 

You may well believe that this was wise counsel, 
seeing that the Emperor of Almaine had more men 
of war a-land than the King of England, and the 
King of England had more men of war on the sea 
than the Emperor, so that though they could no more 
prevail one against the other than an elephant and a 
whale, yet if they were unied and in accord they 
could defy all Europe. 

So when King Edward sent messengers to his 
nephew praying him with right courtesy and affection 
to visit him in England, the Emperor Wilhelm hasted 
to journey thitherward. And when he had made his 
purveyance of presents for his uncle the King, and of 
Red Eagles for the chief men of the English 



74 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

governance, he embarked with his great white war- 
horse, and many of his nobles and retainers, and sailed 
from Almaine across the North Sea to England. 

And when he had come a-land, where he was 
received with great honour, incontinent he apparelled 
himself as an English knight, and rode to Shorncliffe 
to review some English men-at-arms, howbeit it rained 
so fiercely that it was great marvel they were not all 
washed into the sea. And after that he continued on 
his viage until he came to the castle of Sandringham 
in Norfolk, as I have herebefore shewed you. 

Of the welcome that King Edward gave to the Emperor of Almaine, 
and how they took their pleasures together at Sandringham. 

You may well believe that King Edward received 
his nephew the Emperor of Almaine joyously, for 
greatly he loved him and made him good cheer, as 
he was wont to do to all who visited him. Quoth he, 
" Fair nephew, I greatly desire to shew you all love 
and courtesy, and that you should have much joy of 
your sojourn at Sandringham. I pray you, therefore, 
to choose what pleasure or sport you will, and I will 
accord thereto right gladly." 

And the Emperor Wilhelm answered, " Fair uncle, 
I take great joy in hunting and shooting, let us go 
into the woods and see what game may be found there." 

When it was thus shewn to the King what the 



The King's Guests 75 

Emperor was minded to do, incontinent he ordered 
that a great company of men and boys should be 
sent forward into the coverts to drive the birds 
together to the place where the King and the 
Emperor might shoot at them with their cross-bows. 




THE KING OF ENGLAND AND THE EMPEROR WILHELM OF ALMAINE 
SHOOT TOGETHER AT SANDRINGHAM. 

In this wise there was killed so great a number 
of faisans that it was a marvel to behold, besides 
many conies and divers other savage creatures. 

This the King and the Emperor and the Prince of 
Wales did on some days, and on other days they would 
ride a-hunting. 



Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Now there were sojourning at the castle of Sand- 
ringham at this time certain of the governance of 
England, whom the King had bidden there, and 
amongst these were Sir Arthur de Balfour, the lord 
de Lansdowne, the lord de Londonderry, Sir Joseph 
de Birmingham, and Sir John de Brodrick, and these 
were bidden to ride with the King. But I trow that 
Sir Arthur de Balfour and Sir Joseph de Birmingham 
were much discomforted, for they loved not horses 
and would rather have gone a-foot. 

Ye may know of a surety that this business of the 
King and his nephew was as I have set it down, and 
none otherwise. 

Howbeit it was bruited abroad that the Emperor 
had come to England to make certain treaties. And 
it has been told to me that it was a common jangle 
to say, "What cloth the Emperor Wilhelm think to 
get, seeing that England hath no more Heligolands 
to yield to Almaine." 

When the Emperor Wilhelm had made an end of 
his visit to his uncle he thanked him greatly for his 
entertainment, and took leave of him. And after he 
departed and rode with his nobles to sojourn a two 
or three days with the lord de Lonsdale, who was 
in great favour with the Emperor. And thereafter 
he continued his journey to Dalmeny Castle where 
the Earl of Durdans received him with great honour. 




o 8 

S tn 

td W 

s a 



78 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

And after the Emperor of Almaine went to his 
ship that was awaiting him in the harbour, and sailed 
back again to his country. 

How the King Dom Carlos of Portugal did also visit the King of 
England at SandHngham. 

When the Emperor of Almaine had departed from 




THE KING DOM CARLOS OF PORTUGAL AND THE PRINCE OF WALES 
GO A-SHOOTING. 

the Castle of Sandringham there came King Dom 
Carlos of Portugal to visit King Edward. For the 
English and the Portugalois in former times were 
allied together in many adventures of battle against 
the Spaniards and the French, and so King Edward 



The King's Guests 79 

had joy of the coming of Dom Carlos, and welcomed 
him right gladly. 

The King Dom Carlos, in like wise as the Emperor 
Wilhelm, took great pleasure in sport, and so he went 
a-hunting and a-shooting together with the King, or 
the Prince of Wales. 

But there were so many faisans, and conies, and 
other savage creatures in the land around the castle 
that not a few were left alive even after the King's 
guests had departed. 

Dom Carlos also, like the Emperor of Almaine, 
apparelled himself one day in the manner of an 
English knight, and rode to make inspection of some 
English men-at-arms. 

You must know that it is the custom of a Kine or 

o 

a Prince that when he goeth to another country he 
shall array himself as a knight of the country in 
which he is sojourning, and the King of that country, 
by exchange of courtesy, will apparel himself as 
though he were a knight of the realm from which 
his visitor cometh. 

In this wise they do honour to one another, but 
you may well believe it is a great trouble to a king, 
when he is on a viage to foreign countries, to carry 
with him so great a store of harness. 



CHAPTER X 

How the Dutch leaders came to England and were presented to the 
King and Sir Joseph de Birmingham, and how they and Oom 
Paul wrote books about the war in Africa. 

NOW let us return to speak of the leaders of 
the Dutch who had fought so felly against 
the English in Africa. 

So soon as the war had been made an end of, 
and peace had been accomplished, De La Rey, 
Botha and De Wet departed from Africa and sailed 
to England. And because they had withstood the 
English army so stoutly they were received right 
courteously, for the people said, " They are no more 
our enemies, but are unied with us in the same 
Empire, more they are brave men who have done 
their devoir to their country, and therefore they 
deserve to be honoured." 

And so it fell about that they were presented to 
the King, and afterwards they held converse with 
Sir Joseph de Birmingham about the business of 
Africa, and how some remedy might be found for 
the distresses that the war had caused. And though 



So 



De La Rey, Botha, and De Wet 81 

Sir Joseph would not yield to them all that they 
demanded, which, indeed, I am minded to believe 
they did not expect to obtain, they were in no wise 
contrarious, saying that though they had hoped 
Sir Joseph de Birmingham would have given them 
more of the things they had required, they would 
not withsay him, or withdraw them back from the 
treaty that had been compacted at Vereeniging. 

For howbeit they held themselves to have rightly 
done their devoir to their country in withstanding the 
English to the end, now that they had yielded they 
were minded to be liege subjects of their sovereign 
lord King Edward, and to aid the governance to 
remedy the hurt and damage that the war had done 
in the land for which they had fought. 

This greatly pleased the English, though some 
there were who were vexed that the Dutch leaders 
should have gone to Holland, and France, and Almaine 
to seek aid. It hath been shewed me that divers of 
those in England who had always withstood the 
making of the war in Africa, saying that the Dutch 
had the more just cause, were also sore vexed that 
De La Rey and Botha and De Wet held themselves 
aloof from them, and would not listen to their counsels, 
thinking it to be behoveful and more convenable to 
save themselves from the unwisdom of their friends. 

More, I have been told that when certain of these 

o 



82 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

friends came to hold converse with them, so soon as 
these had entered the one door of their lodging in- 
continent the Dutchmen would go out by the other 
door and so avoided them. But I cannot of a surety 
say if this was as I have told you for I set it down 
only as it was related to me. 

Howbeit the Dutch leaders, though they demeaned 
themselves right courteously and with all fealty, and 
were treatable and glad of acquaintance, did contrive 
to countervenge them upon the English. 

And the manner of their doing it was in this wise. 

They set themselves to write books concerning 
the war, shewing how the Dutch had for so long 
continued to withstand the English. And specially 
De Wet did set down in the chronicles which he 
wrote all his enterprises and adventures against the 
English, how he scrimmished with them and often 
discomfited them to their damage, and how he avoided 
them when they thought to have encompassed or 
overtaken him. 

Among those who thus wrote books about the 
war was Oom Paul, who was formerly lord over the 
Transvaal, and who had fled to Holland when the 
Earl de Bobs and the English army seized his towns. 
Oom Paul was now sojourning in Holland, where he 
was held in high repute by the Dutchmen, who deemed 
him to have been cruelly oppressed. 



De La Key, Botha, and De Wet 83 

When Oom Paul saw that his country was lost to 




DE WET WRITETH OF THE WAR. 

him beyond all remedy, he set himself to write down 



84 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

the history of the divers disputations between himself 




OOM PAUL WRITETH HIS CHRONICLES. 



and Sir Joseph de Birmingham, and the matters out 
of which the war arose. 



De La Key, Botha, and De Wet 85 

And you may well believe that his chronicles did 




SIR JOHN DE BRODRICK READETH THE CHRONICLES OF DE WET. 



not greatly favour the English, specially Sir Joseph 



86 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

de Birmingham, for there was little amity between 
him and Oom Paul. 

It might well have been thought that these books 
would have been sore displeasant for the English to 
read, but truth it is that though they be orgulous, 
yet they are right generous towards those who have 
fought against them with valiance, and so they bought 
these chronicles and read them, saying, " Let us con- 
sider the other side of the matter, for so it behoveth 
us to do if we would profit from experience." And 
it hath been told me that Sir John de Brodrick, who 
had the ordering of the army in England, read the 
records of the war with great diligence, howbeit 
there were many matters set forth in them that mar- 
vellously discomforted him. For he greatly desired 
to learn the art of war, the more so because the 
Emperor of Almaine had made him a gift of a Red 
Eagle, which is the bird of war, and therefore he was 
minded to live up to it and to be deemed a knight 
of great puissance in war. 

How a great monster called the Spearpoint Drorgan came across the 
sea and sore affrayed the English. 

Let us now go back to speak of how, in this same 
year a thousand nine hundred and two, the English 
were greatly affrayed by reason of a huge, mighty, 
perilous, and dreadful monster that came from the 
West across the sea to England. The bigness thereof 



The Spearpoint Drorgan 



87 



was a marvel to behold, and men called it the Spear- 




point Drorgan, for it had as it were great spears on 



Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

its head and neck, so that none could in any wise 
overcome or sit upon it. 

Now this Drorgan was as puissant on land as on 
the water, for it was both a Drorgan and a Sea- Fish, 
and for this reason it was also called The Great 
Combine. 

Now the English, specially those who had no ships 
to sell, were sore discomforted when they knew that 
the Spearpoint Drorgan was coming ; for it was 
bruited abroad that the monster was seizing upon all 
the English ships that it encountered by the way, so 
that the English began to fear there would be no 
more vessels left to them wherein to carry their 
banners. For you must know that the English take 
pride that they have more ships, both great and 
small, than hath any other country. Also it was said 
that the Drorgan was minded to come a-land in 
England, and to seize and take away the Abbey 
Church of Westminster, and the Castle of London, 
and the King's castles, and his crowns, and sceptres, 
and orb, and all the treasures of the country. 

But I trow that those who said these things were 
dismayed without reason, for in the end, as it hath 
been shewed me, the Drorgan, though of a truth it 
seized upon all those ships that could not avoid it, 
yet it spouted out streams of gold to pay for them, 
so that no man received hurt or damage thereby. 



The Spearpoint Drorgan 89 

Howbeit there were some who sailed away when 
the Drorgan would have taken their ships, saying, 
"We would rather keep our ships than have the 
Drorgan's gold." 

Neither did the Drorgan seize or carry away 
any of the treasures of England, as it was bruited 
that it had a mind to do. 

But when it would have dug a hole underneath 
London, the citizens would in no wise agree, saying 
that it behoved them to draw a line somewhere. 



CHAPTER XI 

How Sir Joseph de Birmingham departed out of England, and ivent 
to Africa, and the reason of his going. 

YE may well believe that there was great confusion 
in Africa after the war had been made an end 
of, seeing that the oxen had been devoured, and 
many places brent and destroyed, and the land laid 
waste. For so it must ever be when men make war 
upon each other. 

Now when one country prevaileth over another, 
but desireth not to add to its territories, it with- 
draweth its army back after the victory, making a 
treaty whereby it secureth great finance and ransom, 
and the country that is overcome must needs remedy 
its own hurt and damage. 

But in this business of the war in Africa, of which 
I have herebefore told you, the case was otherwise, 
for King Edward of England had proclaimed himself 
to be the lord paramount over the lands of the Trans- 
vaal and the Orange State, and so the Dutch and 
the English were to be unied in one Empire. 

Now when men of different countries have with- 

90 



The Voyage of Sir Joseph 91 

stood each other, fighting felly and slaying on either 
side, they do not always have so great and sudden 
an affection for those who have fought fiercely against 
them as is needful when they have to dwell together 
under the same governance and laws. 

Sir Joseph de Birmingham, whose business it was 
in the governance of England to order matters relating 
to those parts of Africa which appertained to England, 
sorely mused how he might contrive that the English 
and the Dutch might accord together, and live in 
amity. To this end he resolved that he would himself 
journey to Africa, and see what could be done in 
that wise. And he was the more minded to go on 
this viage, not only because he deemed that it 
behoved him to remedy the mischief, which some said 
he had brought about, but because Sir Arthur de 
Balfour and others of the governance were allied 
with the Bishops and the clergy in an adventure of 
which I will speak before I have made an end of 
these chronicles. 

In former times Sir Joseph had no great love for 
the Bishops, and was disdainous to them. But this 
was before he performed his vigil at Hatfield, and 
renounced his allegiance to the Buffs, repenting him 
of all the works he had wrought with them, and had 
been absolved and received into the party of the 
Blues. 



92 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

And howbeit the Bishops and the clergy now spake 
reverently of Sir Joseph de Birmingham, he could not 
entirely accord with them, and he was discomforted by 
the alliance of which I have spoken, the more so by 
reason of the murmurations that were made by certain 




SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM DEPARTETH ON HIS VIAGE. 

of his retainers at Birmingham, who, though they had 
followed him when he joined himself to the Blues, yet 
could not altogether rid themselves of their former 
faith. 

And so when he had made purveyance for his 



The Voyage of Sir Joseph 93 

journey, Sir Joseph departed from his castle of High- 
bury with trumpets, and shawms, and sackbuts, and 
psalteries, and lighted torches, and rode to London 
and onward to Southampton, where was a King's ship, 
the Bonne Esperance, awaiting him. He journeyed in 
right royal style, on the King's horses, and in the 
King's carriages, and so went on board the ship, and 
sailed towards Africa. 

How Sir Joseph de Birmingham tarried by the way in Egypt^ and 
saw the Pyramids and the Sphinx. How he aftenvards crossed 
the Equator, and the gifts he received from Neptune. 

Now Sir Joseph was minded to see as much of 
Africa as he could on the way, and so he caused the 
ship to be put a-land when it came to Egypt, for 
greatly he desired to visit the country where in ancient 
times there had ruled another puissant and pushful 
man of the same name as himself. 

Moreover, he was minded that the name of Joseph 
should not be forgotten in the land of the Pharaohs, 
and thus he went on shore, where he was received 
right honourably and courteously by the ruler, who 
caused to be shewed to him all the wonders of his 
country, the Pyramids, and the scarabs, and the 
mummies, and the temples, and the tombs. 

Sir Joseph had great joy of seeing these things, 
and specially it was right pleasant to behold the 
Sphinx, seeing that great men in history have ever 



94 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

been wont to journey thitherward to see if haply 
they may discern the semblance of themselves. 




The Voyage of Sir Joseph 95 

And when Sir Joseph had assured himself in this 
matter, he departed from Egypt in his ship, and sailed 
on until they came to the Equator, which geographiers 
hold to be a line drawn around the world midway 




THE SPHINX. 



between the North Pole and the South Pole. A 
right perilous line it is to cross, for when the ship 
would pass it, there cometh up out of the sea a wild 
man, who avoucheth himself to be the heathen god, 



g6 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Neptune, and unless there be largesse and ransom 
paid to him, he evilly and cruelly useth those who 
would pass through his kingdom for the first time. 

And so, when the Bonne Esperance would have 
sailed over the Equator, incontinent this wild man 
came aboard, and demanded to see Sir Joseph de 
Birmingham. 

I trow that Sir Joseph would gladly have avoided 




COIN OF SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM. 

( Westminster Records.} 

holding converse with Neptune, but he could do none 
otherwise, and so he went with good grace and did 
homage to him as the King of the Ocean. And 
Neptune spake right fairly and courteously, and 
ordained him a knight of the order of the Sardine, 
for the which honour Sir Joseph gave him thanks 
and great largesse, and so Neptune departed back 
again to his kingdom. 



The Voyage of Sir Joseph 97 

But it hath been told me that before he went away 
from the ship he drew out of a net that he carried 
with him an hour-glass, and a long spoon, and a 
squeezed sponge or coral, and a packet that was 
inscribed " Old Age Pensions Scheme," and gave 
them to Sir Joseph, saying that he had fortuned to 
find them at the bottom of the sea. 

But whether this was so I cannot of a surety say. 

How Sir Joseph de Birmingham came to Uganda^ and of the divers 
wild beasts that abound therein. 

After the Bonne Esperance had crossed the 
Equator, as I have shewed you, it sailed to Mombasa 
which lieth on the east side of Africa in Uganda, 
which is one of the territories of the British Empire, 
for Sir Joseph was minded to visit it for divers 
reasons. The English had made there a great and 
costly road through the country, and there had been 
many disputations about the matter in the English 
Parliament. For there were some who held it to 
have been an evil thing to waste so much treasure 
on a road that was in no wise needed. 

Of a truth I well believe that more money was 
spent in the making of the road than was just, for 
things that are done by a governance are ever waste- 
ful and extravagant. And in the making of it there 
were many lives destroyed in a strange and terrible 
manner by the marvellous fierceness of the lions. 

H 



9 8 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

For Uganda aboundeth in divers fearsome wild 
beasts, the olifawnte, the gerfaunt, the unicorn, the 
tragelaphus, the behemoth, the leviathan that beareth 
armour upon him, the lion, the libbard, and the hyaena. 

And of all these the lion is the most fearsome 
and perilous, for he ever raveneth for his prey, and 




SIR JOSEPH DE BIRMINGHAM BEHOLDETH A LION AND A UNICORN. 

when he perceives that the hunters are pursuing him 
he eraseth his footprints with his tail, so that he 
cannot be traced to his lair, and thus he avoideth 
those that would slay him. 

Sir Joseph greatly desired to see some of these 
monsters, specially the lion and the unicorn, for 



The Voyage of Sir Joseph 99 

England beareth these creatures for supporters, and so 
he journeyed a certain distance into the country to 
behold them, to the end that when he returned 
back to England he could the more readily discourse 
about the wild beasts that guard the Crown of the 
Empire. 

But he was not covetise of their coming to him 
too closely, and so he made haste and went back to 
his ship, and so on to the place where he was minded 
to go. 

What afterwards befell Sir Joseph de Birmingham 
in Africa, and of his mission there, I will relate to 
you hereafter when I have fuller knowledge. 



CHAPTER XII 

How the Bishops brought petitions to the governance, praying that 
the Churc/i might be relieved from the burden of paying for its 
schools. 

IT hath been long sith I spake of holy Church or 
of the business of the Parliament in England ; 
now I will return thereto ; the matter requireth it 
seeing that the two were unied in a marvellous 
manner as I shall now shew you. 

Ye have well heard herebefore, how by the exhor- 
tation of Sir Arthur de Balfour the Commons had 
made divers changes in their rules of procedure, 
which were contrarious to their old customs, to the 
end that Sir Arthur and others might with greater 
ease achieve the business they were minded to do in 
the country of a Saturday. Now this business, as I 
have already shewed you, was the playing of golf, 
which Sir Arthur de Balfour loved above all games. 
And when this had been achieved, he did not pursue 
the matter, howbeit the changes that he intended were 
in no wise made an end of, saying that the business 
could wait for a season, and that what had already 
been done, though it was not complete, was like a 
part of a beautiful statue and might justly be admired 
for itself. 



The Bishops and the Governance 101 

Of a surety I trow that the Commons had no leisure 
for any matters but those of holy Church, and what 
this business was I will now relate to you. Ye must 
know that in England, howbeit the Church is allied 
with the State, there be many sects which are not 
in accord with it, and these are called Nonconformists, 
or Dissenters as you will. 

And besides these there are a certain number of 
Roman Catholics who have their own Bishops and 
priests, and yield allegiance to the Pope. 

In like wise there be divers kinds of schools. Some 
are not unied with any Church or sect, but are 
maintained by the people : others are ordered other- 
wise, and these, which are called denominational 
schools, belong for the most part to the Church of 
England. 

Now the burden of supporting these schools, of 
which I last spake, was not a light one, and the 
Bishops and the clergy had for a long time mused 
how they might find some remedy or relief, howbeit 
they were minded that these schools should ever 
continue to be allied to the Church. 

And so, seeing that the party of the Blues, which 
greatly favoured the nobility, clergy, and gentry, held 
the governance against the Buffs with puissance, the 
Bishops and the clergy resolved that they would 
demand of the governance that the cost of the Church 



iO2 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

schools should be lifted from their shoulders and put 
upon the whole people. 




The Bishops and the Governance 103 

Quoth they, " We have ever aided the Blues 
against the Buffs, and it is behoveful that great favour 
should be shewed to us. Have not the Blues great 
puissance now after the victory they obtained in the 
year of our Lord a thousand and nine hundred ? For 
in that season there were many of the Buffs who 
either did not join their own banners, or who allied 
themselves to the Blues for a time by reason of the 
war in Africa. For did not Sir Joseph de Birmingham 
proclaim that to aid the Buffs in that battle was to 
aid the Dutch to prolong the war ? Let us therefore 
go to the governance with ten thousand petitions and 
demand of them that we be relieved from the burden 
that poistereth us so grievously." 

And when they had spoken in this wise they 
assembled together in Convocation and made great 
purveyance of petitions. Then the Bishops put on 
their oldest vestments, and rent them, and put clouted 
shoes on their feet, in like manner as the children of 
Gibeon when they made an ambassade to Joshua ; for 
they desired to shew how they were oppressed and 
impoverished by their burdens. 

How Sir Arthur de Balfour caused a Bill to be drafted, and how 
the governance carried it through Parliament. 

Now the governance of the Blues had ever been 
minded to favour the Bishops and clergy, as I have 
herebefore shewed you, and indeed they had often 



104 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

done so. But they could not do all they would, for 
the Buffs withstood them stoutly in this matter, saying 
that it was not just to favour the Church more than 
any other sect. 




SIR JONAH GORST IS CAST OVERBOARD. 

And so when the governance had aviewed the 
petitions which the Bishops brought to them, they 
agreed that they would accord thereto, saying, "It may 



The Church Schools Bill 105 

never again fortune us to be so puissant as the 
business of the war and the discomforts of the Buffs 
have made us in this present season. Therefore let 
us reward those who have been our friends whilst 
we have the power." 

And it was in this wise that Sir Arthur de Balfour, 
howbeit he was not covetise of overtravail, set himself 
to devise how the people might be made to pay for 
the Church schools, and yet that the control over 
them should not be taken away from the Church. 

Now there was in the governance a certain knight, 
Sir Jonah Gorst, whose business it was to see to the 
schools. He was a man of wisdom in counsel, but 
contrarious, and, whether by reason of his making 
himself displeasant, or in what wise I know not, he 
was cast overboard out of the ship, and another 
counsellor was appointed in his place to draft a Bill 
and to advise Sir Arthur de Balfour. 

It would take me too long a time to set down all 
the disputations over this matter of the Education Bill 
in Parliament, even indeed if I rightly comprehended 
the true foundation of the business, which no man 
doth, I trow. 

It hath been shewed me, and I well believe it, 
that the Blues and the Buffs could not in any wise 
agree, and those who fought against the Bill, among 
whom Sir James de Bryce did his devoir with valiant- 



106 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 




MONK DRAFTING A BILL. 

(Education Records.} 



ness, resisted so stoutly that it was not until the 



The Church Schools Bill 



107 



middle of the last month of the year that the govern- 
ance were able to make an end of the matter. It hath 
also been told me that they would not have achieved 
their purpose even then if Sir Arthur de Balfour had 
not in the autumn of this same year hastened the 




SIR JAMES DE BRYCE SPEAKETH AGAINST THE BILL. 

business by ever and anon seizing upon the Buffs in the 
Commons, and shutting them up in compartments whence 
they could neither escape nor make their voices heard. 

The Buffs were greatly angered at this, declaring 
that they had been cruelly ill-treated and gagged. 



io8 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 



There were some also on the side of the Blues 
who did not accord with all that Sir Arthur de Balfour 
was minded to do. 

One of these was his cousin, Lord Hughligan de 




HUGH OF HATFIELD DESIGNETH A SCHOOL. 

Cecil, a son of my lord of Salisbury, and commonly 
known as Hugh of Hatfield. He was pious and of 
great devotion in ecclesiastical matters, and he desired 
that the Church and the schools should be so closely 



The Church Schools Bill 109 

unied that a child entering the school could in no 
wise avoid coming out but only through the Church. 

But Sir Arthur de Balfour was contrarious to his 
cousin, and would not altogether accord with his plan, 
whereat Hugh of Hatfield was sore vexed. 

Ye must know that even the Blues for the most 
part are not minded to see the Bishops and the clergy 
in too great puissance, and so when a certain Sir 
Kenyon Slaney, who was a stout Protestant, counselled 
that the clergy should not be allowed to have their 
own way too much in the schools, the Commons 
agreed with him, howbeit there was marvellous con- 
fusion for a time as to how words might be devised 
which should make the matter clear. 

When the Bill had been made an end of in the 
Commons it was brought before the Lords. Now the 
lords being Blues for the greater part, and the Bishops 
who sit in that assembly being privy to the Bill, ye 
may well know that it took but a little time to pass 
it into law. 

Howbeit the Bishops contrived to get still more for 
their schools than had already been devised in the 
Bill, and though this was a breach of the privileges 
of the House of Commons the Bishops walked wilily 
and obtained by craft that which they desired. 

For howbeit the clergy often err through lack of 
knowledge of worldly matters, it is a marvellous thing 



no Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

that the mistakes they make are for the most part in 
their own favour. But though Sir Arthur de Balfour 
and the Bishops succeeded in their enterprise, I well 
believe that the matter is not yet made an end of 
altogether. For the Bill was sore displeasant to the 
Buffs, and Dr. John Clifford and other leaders of the 




DR. JOHN CLIFFORD PREACHING TO THE PEOPLE. 

Nonconformists went about preaching to the people 
that it was an evil and unjust thing to compel them 
to pay for the Church schools, and that they should 
resist it. 

Quoth they, "If the Church desire th to teach its 
own creeds, then should it pay its own expenses. 



The Archbishop of Canterbury in 

Why should we pay for what we have no control 
over?" 




FRAGMENT OF A BAS-RELIEF DISCOVERED AT WESTMINSTER. 

How the Archbishop of Canterbury passed out of this mortal life. 

On the twenty-third day of December, in the year 
of our Lord a thousand nine hundred and two, on the 
Tuesday before Christmas Day, there passed out of 
the world, at the Palace of Lambeth, the Archbishop 
of Canterbury, the Primate of All England. He was of 
a great age, four score and one years, but of marvel- 
lous courage and devotion. 

He was not gentle in speech, for he would not 
dissimule but said ever what he thought. Howbeit 
he was in no wise orgulous, striving only to do his 
devoir without fear or favour. 

Thus he was held in great repute, though there 
were some among the clergy who feared him more 
than they loved him. 



ii2 Froissart's Modern Chronicles 

Even when he had grown old he avoided not the 

brunt of battle, but 
fought with great 
valiantness until his 
strength failed him. 
In former times he 
had been of the party 
of the Buffs, but 
though he withstood 
them at the last in 
the matter of the 
Church schools, they 
still held him in 
esteem, howbeit they 
deemed him to be in 
the wrong in this 
enterprise. And on 
the twenty - seventh 
day of the same 
month of December, 
on the Saturday 
ARCHBISHOP TEMPLE. following his death, 

the Archbishop was 

buried in the Cathedral of Canterbury. 

And all men mourned him for a stout and valiant 

soldier of the Church. 




UNWIN BROTHERS. LIMITED, PRINTERS, WOKING AND LONDON. 



BINDING SECT. JUN 1 9 1967 



DA 
560 



Gould, (Sir) Francis 
Carruthers 

Froissart's moder 
chronicles 



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